The effect on NEDs of proposed reforms to IR35

The effect on NEDs of proposed reforms to IR35

Some non-executive directors (NEDs) also provide consulting services to the companies on whose boards they sit and to others. How will the proposed changes to IR35 affect the provision of those consulting services?

HMRC published a consultation paper Off-payroll working rules from April 2020 on 5  March 2019. The consultation period closed on 28 May and the results will be taken into account when the Finance Bill is published in the summer. It seems likely, based on the consultation document, that existing public-sector legislation (Chapter 10, Part 2 of ITEPA 2003) will be the starting point for legislation governing the private-sector, but we will have to wait for the Finance Bill to find out for sure.

Since 2017, public-sector companies have been responsible for determining whether those they engage to provide services are employees or independent contractors. Private-sector companies have been spared this responsibility, which hitherto has fallen on the service provider. From April 2020, however, medium-sized and large private-sector companies will also be responsible for determining whether an agreement to provide services amounts to a deemed employment. No new tax is being introduced; only a change to the person responsible for determining if a deemed employment exists and for accounting for income tax and NICs.

Many individuals provide their services through a personal service company (PSC) which receives the fees paid for the services provided and from which the individual may receive a salary and possibly dividends. From 2020, private-sector companies will have to disregard the existence of a PSC and decide if the individual should be treated as an employee for tax and NIC purposes if engaged directly.

From next April, if a private-sector company decides that its agreement for the provision of services amounts to a deemed employment, it (and not the PSC) will be required to deduct income tax and NICs from the fees it pays, for those services.  This change is likely to mean more work for in-house HR teams and their (internal and external) legal advisers and could involve a substantial increase in the fee-payer’s employer’s NICs liability. If the new legislation follows the public-sector regime, three key consequences will flow from the requirement to make an assessment as to whether, for tax and NIC purposes, an employment relationship exists between it and an individual contractor:

• the company must inform its contracting party (agency or PSC) of the outcome of its assessment when the contract is made and may also have to inform the individual contractor of its decision;

• if any questions are raised about the company’s assessment, it has 31 days in which to respond; and

• the company must take reasonable care when making its determination as to whether a deemed employment exists.

This will affect NEDs who are also contracted to provide consulting services in the same way as it affects other contractors. A directorship is separate from an engagement to provide consulting services. Fees for carrying out the office of director are subject to income tax and NICs, payable through the PAYE system.  However, whether consulting fees are subject to the same deductions depends on the nature and terms of the agreement and on whether a deemed employment exists. It would, therefore, seem sensible for any agreement to provide consulting services to remain separate from an agreement to carry out the office of director.

For further information, contact Paul Norris.

Posted in 2019, News.